Добавил:
Upload Опубликованный материал нарушает ваши авторские права? Сообщите нам.
Вуз: Предмет: Файл:
IKP Practice.doc
Скачиваний:
35
Добавлен:
08.06.2015
Размер:
893.95 Кб
Скачать

1. What function does the article perform?

2. Say who belongs to the target audience.

3. Analyse the verbal means used by the author, paying special attention to figurative language.

4. What is peculiar of the structure of the text?

Ex. 2. Discussion. Express your opinion about the following. Do men ever read articles of the kind? What article do they usually read?

Ex. 3. Follow-up. Analyse the following components of communication situation: sender and receiver, code, channel, message, noise. Take into account the communicative context.

UNIT 9

The Role of Communication Strategies

in Interaction

Recap the following theoretical issues.

1. Define a communication strategy. What’s the difference between a strategy and a tactics?

2. Recall typical communicative strategies and tactics used in public speeches and printed media.

3. What tactics are typically used in conversation?

Task 1. Louise

Ex. 1. Identifying aspects of communication. Read the story “Louise” by W.S. Maugham and get ready to dwell on the main elements of the communicative episode described in the text.

1. Did the story-teller and Louise have similar mental sets? How did this affect their communication?

2. Analyse Louise’s verbal behavior. Does she mean what she says?

3. Apply the Coordinated Management of Meaning theory to the analysis of the author’s and Louise’s behavior (identify speech acts, episodes, relationship, life script, cultural pattern).

4. What communicative goals do the participants pursue? What means do they use to achieve them?

Ex. 2. Discussion. Express your opinion about the following. Why didn’t the author succeed in persuading Louise to change her behavior on account of Iris?

Ex. 3. Follow-up. Analyse the communication in the story from the point of view of the communicative strategies, tactics and means the participants use to achieve their goals.

Task 2. The Perfect Murder

Ex. 1. Identifying aspects of communication. Read the story “The Perfect Murder” by J. Archer and get ready to dwell on the main elements of the communicative episode described in the text.

1. Did the story-teller envisage the consequences of his communicative behavior? Can we call it “mindless processing” or was it something else? Give your reasons.

2. How did the story-teller change his behavior to conceal the truth?

3. Did he manage to take in his wife, the police, the judge and the jury? What helped him?

Ex. 2. Discussion. Express your opinion about the following. Why couldn’t Mr. Menzies prove that he was innocent? What caused his communicative failure?

Ex. 3. Follow-up. Analyse the communication in the story from the point of view of the communicative strategies and tactics the participants use to achieve their communicative goals.

Task 3. The Lumber Room

Ex. 1. Identifying aspects of communication. Read the short story “The Lumber Room” by H.H. Munro and get ready to dwell on the main elements of the communicative episode described in the text.

1. Did Nicholas’ disgraceful behavior at breakfast table lead to the consequences he had envisaged?

2. How did the grown-ups explain to Nicholas that he was being punished? Did the older people succeed in communicating this idea to Nicolas?

3. Why didn’t the aunt manage to persuade Nicolas to disobey the rules just for once?

Ex. 2. Discussion. Express your opinion about the following. Nicolas says that his aunt often didn’t listen when the children told her important things. How can you comment on her behavior?

Ex. 3. Follow-up. Analyse the communication in the story from the point of view of the communicative strategies and tactics the participants use to achieve their communicative goals.

Task 4. Clean Sweep Ignatius

Ex. 1. Identifying aspects of communication. Read the story “Clean Sweep Ignatius” by J. Archer Munro and get ready to dwell on the main elements of the communicative episode described in the text.

1. Describe Ignatius Agarbi’s mental set.

2. What accounts for Ignatius’ communicative success?

3. What communicative goal did Ignatius Agarbi try to achieve during his conversation with a banker? What communicative strategy did he implement to realize his plan?

Ex. 2. Discussion. Express your opinion about the following. What type of discourse does the conversation at the bank represent? What are the main characteristics of the given type of discourse?

Ex. 3. Follow-up. Analyse the communication in the story from the point of view of the communicative strategies and tactics the participants use to achieve their communicative goals.

Task 5. Cheap at Half the Price

Ex. 1. Identifying aspects of communication. Read the story “Cheap at Half the Price” by J. Archer and get ready to dwell on the main elements of the communicative episode described in the text.

1. Comment on Consuela’s ingenious plan. Was she sure it would work out?

2. Can we say that Consuela was telling lies? Prove your point of view.

3. Why were the two men so sure their plan with the cheque would work out?

4. What communicative strategy helped Mrs. Consuela Rosenheim achieve her communicative goal? What speech tactics did she implement? Did these tactics prove effective?

Ex. 2. Discussion. Express your opinion about the following. What is meant by the statement “Women are naturally superior to men”? Do you agree with this?

Ex. 3. Follow-up. Analyse the communication in the story from the point of view of the communicative strategies and tactics the participants use to achieve their communicative goals.

Task 6. No! A Thousand Times, No!

Ex. 1. Identifying aspects of communication. Read the following text and get ready to dwell on the main elements of the communicative episode under consideration.

No! A Thousand Times, No!

By F. Sullivan

This is a political speech which has been constructed so adroitly, and with such consummate knowledge of the arts of political oratory, that it can be used for both Republican and Democratic conventions. The gentlemen making the speech need only substitute “Republican” for “Democratic”, or vice versa, as circumstances demand. We have even put in the laughter and applause. We do all this gratis, as a patriotic duty.

The speech follows:

Mr. Chairman, ladies and gentlemen of the Convention:

It is indeed in a time of unprecedented national stress that we, the representatives of the great Republican [Democratic] Party, assemble here to reassert our principles, formulate a platform, and choose a standard-bearer who will so and so and so and so and so and so.

Perhaps never before in the history of our great republic has the Republican [Democratic] Party been faced with a task more worthy of its mettle. It is therefore with a solemn realization of our duties and responsibilities that we should here so and so and so and so and so and so.

A sense of our responsibilities, yes, but also, my friends, with a sense of confidence. Confidence that the Republican [Democratic] Party will not fail America in this, her hour of peril. Confidence that the Republican [Democratic] Party will, in this crisis, prove itself worthy and fulfill the glorious tradition of its so and so and so and so and so and so.

Has the Republican [Democratic] Party ever failed America? (Shouts of “No!”) Has the party of Hamilton [Jefferson], of Lincoln [Cleveland], of Roosevelt [Wilson] ever proved itself recreant to the sacred trust which the people of these great United States have so and so and so and so?

No, my friends! A thousand times, no!

The Republican [Democratic] Party has an unsullied and honorable record of patriotic service to which it may point with justifiable pride. To our detractors we can say with truth, as we look them square in the eye, that the Republican [Democratic] Party has at least never been saddled with a Tammany [Harding].

My friends, our country is beset today with dangers. I need not describe them to you. You are intelligent, patriotic Americans. You know what is going on. And it is very hot here and the Convention has a great deal to accomplish, so I

shall not take up any more of your time than is necessary. But they tell me we are in the midst of a depression. (Laughter.)

Ah, my friends, it is no laughing matter, alas. (Applause.)

Who is responsible for that depression?

I will tell you, my friends. I will tell you who is responsible. The Democratic [Republican] Party is responsible. (Great applause.)

Yes. The same Democratic [Republican] Party which through the years has mouthed its high-sounding but empty platitudes about its sacred trust, its God-given mission; that same Democratic [Republican] Party which you have heard – oh, so often – protesting that it is the so and so and so and so of the rights of the people. That same Democratic [Republican] Party, my friends, in the great hour of its country’s need, has failed so miserably, so abjectly, so completely. (Great applause.)

Gentlemen of the Convention – oh, and ladies, too; we certainly must not forget the fair sex, which in recent years has so graciously condescended to lend its charms and wisdom to our deliberations (applause and laughter) – I charge the Democratic [Republican] Party with responsibility for the hard times that afflict the nation at the moment. (Applause.)

I charge the Democratic [Republican] Party with the troubles which beset the farmer. (Applause.)

I charge the Democratic [Republican] Party with the era of lawlessness which is sweeping our nation. (Applause.)

I charge the Democratic [Republican] Party with responsibility for the millions of men who are walking the streets today. I charge that party with so and so, and with so and so, and with so and so and so and so. (Prolonged applause.)

They talk to us, my friends, about the tariff. Well, I want to say to you that the Smoot-Hawley tariff has helped [destroyed] business. It has stimulated [retarded] healthy, free intercourse between the United States and the other nations of the world and I defy any leader of the Democratic [Republican] Party to defy me to so and so and so and so and so and so. (Applause.)

They talk to us about the League of Nations. The position of the Republican [Democratic] Party on that question is clear. My friends, I want to say to you regarding the League of Nations that never before in the history of our country has there been greater need for caution [caution] in a relationship to the other great Nations of the World. (Great applause.)

I further charge the Democratic [Republican] Party with neglecting the veteran. Those brave men who left home and fireside in 1917 to give their all in the smoke and battle of Flanders Field are the so and so and so and so and so and so of our country. We should indeed be a nation of ingrates were we to so and so and so and so them. Let us, as Kipling said, not forget.

Ladies and gentlemen, there is another problem, a problem of vast importance, facing our country, and In should indeed be faithless to the sacred trust you have reposed in me by naming me your temporary chairman were I to fail to discuss it here frankly, honestly, and in the light of the best interests of my country as God gives it me to see that light. (Applause.)

Gentlemen and ladies, I refer to Prohibition.

The Republican [Democratic] Party would indeed be faithless to its trust; it would indeed forfeit its deserved reputation as the champion of liberty and the trustee of the rights of the people if it did not here approach the problem of Prohibition, however vexing, with courage and honesty. (Great applause.)

The time for quibbling, for evasions, has passed. (Applause.) Let us scorn the pussyfooting, the petty hypocrisy, which have constituted the policy of our adversaries, the Democratic [Republican] Party, thus far in dealing with this all-important problem. Let us draft a platform, my friends, that will tell the people of these United States frankly where the Republican [Democratic] Party stands on the subject of Prohibition. (Applause.) And let us nominate a man worthy of that platform. (Great applause.) Let us name as our standard-bearer a man four-square, who will deal with the problem frankly, who will courageously and honestly be dry in those sections of the country where they vote dry, and who will be wet in those sections of the country where they vote wet. (Great applause.)

I warn you, ladies and gentlemen, with no other nominee can you hope to win. I warn you that unless you nominate such a man, the all-wise American public will rise in its wrath and annihilate you at the polls next November. And you will deserve it. (Prolonged applause.)

And so, my friends, as the rays of the setting sun illuminate the so and so and so and so… glorious institutions… Pilgrim Fathers… indomitable spirit… rocky forms of New England… golden prairies of so and so… Washington… Jefferson… our sacred institutions… Lincoln… that star-sprangled banner… glorious heritage.. melting pot… refuge of the poor and the oppressed… and shall never allow the red fires of Communism… America, the hope of the future… weather this crisis gloriously, my friends… emerge victoriously with the help of the Republican [Democratic] Party, to take her rightful place at the head of the nations… and so and so and so and so and so and so and so and so. Ladies and gentlemen of the Convention, I thank you. (Prolonged applause.)

1. Analyse the speech from the point of view of verbal means used. Pay special attention to abstractions, immediate language and ambiguity.

2. Dwell on the means the speech writer uses to attract the audience’s attention, enhance their comprehension and acceptance, retention and retrieval.

Ex. 2. Discussion. Express your opinion about the following. Can you call this speech an “ideal sample” of a political speech?

Ex. 3. Follow-up. Analyse the text from the point of view of the communicative strategies, tactics and means that are used to influence the audience.

Тут вы можете оставить комментарий к выбранному абзацу или сообщить об ошибке.

Оставленные комментарии видны всем.

Соседние файлы в предмете [НЕСОРТИРОВАННОЕ]