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DO YOU SPEAK ENGLISH (КНИГА).doc
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CONTENTS

UNIT GETTING ACQUAINTED………………………………………………4

UNIT II. APPEARANCE………………………………………………………10

UNIT III. CHARACTER………………………………………………………19

UNIT IV. STUDENTS’ LIFE AND UNIVERSITY…………………………...27

UNIT V. MARRIGE AND FAMILY LIFE……………………………………35

UNIT VI. NATIVE CITY……………………………………………………...42

UNIT VII. SHOPPING…………………………………………………………49

UNIT VIII. FOOD AND MEAL……………………………………………….58

UNIT IX. CLOTHES…………………………………………………………..71

UNIT X. EMPLOYMENT……………………………………………………..77

UNIT XI. HEALTH AND MEDICAL AID………………………………...…94

UNIT XII. SPORT ……………………………………………………………105

UNIT XIII. IN THE RICH MAN’S WORLD………………………………...115

UNIT XIV. TRAVELLING…………………………………………………..123

UNIT XV. BRITISH AND AMERICAN ENGLISH………………………...132

UNIT XVI. MYSTERIES OF OUR PLANET……………………………….137

SUPPLEMENTARY UNIT…………………………………………………..142

LIST OF IRREGULAR VERBS……………………………………………..146

Unit I. Getting acquainted

Vocabulary

  1. get acquainted with smb - познакомиться с кем-либо

  2. acquaintance - знакомый, знакомство

  3. introduce smb to smb – представлять кого-либо

  4. address – обращаться

  5. know by sight – знать в лицо

  6. letter of introduction – рекомендательное письмо

  7. shake hands – пожимать руки

  8. spell(one’sname) – называть по буквам

  9. make friends with smb – подружиться

  10. close(bosom)friend– близкий (закадычный) друг

  11. callonsmb– зайти к кому-то

  12. callforsmb– зайти за кем-то

  13. dropbytosmb– заскочить к кому-то ненадолго

  14. polite - вежливый

  15. patronymic – отчество

  16. greeting – приветствие

  17. How do you do? –Здравствуйте

  18. let me introduce myself – позвольте представиться

  19. pleased to meet you – приятно познакомиться

  20. your face seems familiar to me – ваше лицо кажется мне знакомым

Greetings

Possible replies

Good morning! Good afternoon! Hello!

Fine, thanks. Not so bad. Very well

Hi!

indeed.

Good afternoon everybody!

Splendid! Can't complain. I'd rather

Hello there!

not say.

I am happy to welcome you.

More or less. The same old way. Pretty

Allow me to greet you.

much the same.

How are you?

Nothing much. Nothing to boast. So-so.

What's new?

Pretty bad. As bad as ever.

How are you getting on?

Rotten. Lousy. Real bad. From bad to

How are things?

worse. Could be better.

How are you doing?

What's up?

How are the children?

How is your mother keeping?

How are things at home?

Starting and continuing a conversation

Possible replies

I wonder, if you are an Englishman or not?

Come and see us soon.

Haven't we met somewhere before?

Drop by and see us any time.

Where are you from?

You are always welcome.

What do you do for a living?

Keep in touch.

What's your profession?

Remember me to you sister.

What are you studying?

Give our love to your parents.

What's your major?

Please, give my warmest regards to your wife.

Say "Hi" to John from me.

Saying good-bye

I'm afraid it's time for me to go.

May I thank you and say goodbye?

I'm afraid I have to go now.

Must be going, I am afraid.

Sorry to rush off.

It's time for us to leave. We can't stay any longer.

Good-bye! So long! See you soon.

See you later. Bye for now. See you at the University.

Take care. God bless you! Good luck.

Ex. 1. Read and translate the text

What is the right way to address people in English?

When we know a person well, it’s easy, we just call him by his first name. But if we are speaking to someone we know less we use Mr/Mrs/Miss followed by the surname, e.g. Mr. Brown, Mrs. Brown, Miss Brown. Mister or Missus alone, without the surname, are sometimes used, but are not polite, although Miss is generally accepted as a form of address to a woman-teacher by primary-school children.

Sir and madam, on the other hand, are never followed by a name except in the special case when sir is a title, such as Sir Christopher Wren. Sir and madam used alone show respect for position and seniority. Shop assistants and waiters call their customers sir or madam. Schoolchildren call their male teachers sir, though women teachers are never called madam. Sir is also used in the armed forces to address an officer, but in ordinary life soldiers, sailors and airmen call them Colonel, Capitan or Commander. Young men often call older men sir as a mark of respect. But madam is not used in the same way by young women speaking to older ones.

Doctor is used alone only to medical practitioners. When addressing a person with the degree of Doctor of Philosophy or Doctor of Science, for example, the surname is always included, e.g. Dr. Madison.

Professor is used either with or without the surname; depending on how formal or informal you want to be (simply Professor is more formal).

Ladies and gentlemen is used to address an audience. Waiter, Waitress, Porter, Nurse, ets is a possible form of address to people in certain occupations. However, this usage is now becoming rare. Instead, people simply try to catch the waiter’s eyes or say Excuse me. The more usual way to address a stranger is Excuse me, please.

There are some other, less common forms of address:

Your Majesty – to a king or queen;

Your Highness – to a prince or duke;

Your Lordship – to a lord or a High Court judge;

Your Honor – to a magistrate

In the family, children call their parents Mom and Dad, or Mummy and Daddy, sometimes Mother and Father (by adults mostly). Grandparents are addressed as Granny (sometimes Nanny) and Grandpa. Aunts and uncles are called as Auntie or Aunt and Uncle usually with the first name, e.g. Auntie Mary or Aunt Marry, Uncle Michael.

Ex.2. Find the English equivalences in the text.

1. обращаться к людям; 2. по имени; 3. с другой стороны; 4. за исключением особых случаев; 5. в знак уважения; 6. определенные профессии; 7. поймать взгляд; 8. Ваша Светлость; 9. Ваша Честь; 10. называть по имени.

Ex.3. How would you address the following people?

  1. your aunt Marry Smith

  2. a friend of your own age (Sandra Perl)

  3. Sandra’s father/mother

  4. a university professor PhD (Tom Smith)

  5. a stranger

  6. your teacher

  7. your doctor (George East)

  8. Director of the company you work for

  9. an older colleague (Paul Brown)

  10. an elderly woman in the street

Ex. 4. Suggest a suitable form of address.

  1. “… could you tell me the quickest way to the railway station?” (to a stranger).

  2. “… it hurts here…” (to your doctor Alan Price during the examination)

  3. “How nice to see you again, …” (to an old friend of yours)

  4. “Will you come in and sit down, …. Mrs. Green will be with you in 5 minutes.” (a visitor, Michael Black)

  5. “…, I have great pleasure in introducing Professor Robinson from Chicago University" (to an audience)

Ex. 5. Introduce the following people to each other.

  1. a fellow-student to your mother;

  2. a guest professor to his audience;

  3. yourself to a group of students;

  4. a friend of your age to an elderly lady at the party;

  5. a colleague (Robert Brown) to your husband/wife;

  6. your brother to the director of your company, you want him to get a job with the company.

Ex. 6. Listen and insert the missing words into the dialogues.

1.

  • Can you do me a favour, Jim? Would you mind ______________ me to Miss Jones?

  • Oh, yes, ______ _____________ , though it’s rather strange you don’t know each other yet.

  • I just didn’t have a chance __ _______ ___________ with her. Is she a nice girl?

  • Yes, of course, and she has a very nice dog.

2.

- Harry, have you met Mr. Grey?

- No, we have not met.

- Come along then, I’ll _______________ you to him, if you like.

- With pleasure.

- Mr. Grey, I should like ________________ Mr. Smith, a friend of mine.

- How do you do, Mr. Smith? ___________ __ _____ you.

- ____ __ _____ ___ , Mr. Grey? I’m very _____ to know you.

3.

- James, may I _____________ Henry Brown? Mr. Smith, this is Henry Brown. You are _____ to have plenty to say to each other.

- _____ __ _____ ___, Mr. Richardson?

- How do you do, Mr. Brown?

Ex. 7. Translate the dialogues from Russian into English.

1.

- Привет, Билл. Как дела?

- Спасибо, прекрасно. А как твои?

- Спасибо, прекрасно. Знаешь, Билл, я хочу познакомить тебя с Гарри. Он один из моих старых друзей.

- Здравствуйте, Гарри!

- Здравствуйте, Билл!

2.

- Не могли бы Вы представить меня господину Томпсону из британской делегации?

- С удовольствием. Господин Томпсон, разрешите Вам представить господина Петрова из Российской делегации.

- Здравствуйте. Очень рад, господин Петров.

- Здравствуйте, господин Томпсон. Я тоже рад встрече с Вами.

3.

- Вот идет Билл. Ты его знаешь? Он один из моих лучших друзей.

- Нет, я его никогда не встречал.

- Хочешь с ним познакомиться?

- Конечно.

- Привет, Билл. Как дела?

- Неплохо, спасибо. А как твои?

- Спасибо, прекрасно.

4.

- Здравствуйте, господин Блэйк, пришел с Вами попрощаться.

- Добрый день, господин Иванов, Вы уезжаете?

- Да, возвращаюсь домой. Я закончил свою работу здесь.

- Как жаль, нам было приятно с Вами работать.

- Спасибо, Вы очень добры. Всего хорошего.

- Передавайте привет Вашей жене.

- Спасибо, передам. До свидания.

Ex. 8. Practice the dialogues. Then try to make up your own.

1.

R.: Harry, have you met Mr. Grey?

S.: No, we have not met.

R.: Come along then, and I’ll introduce you to him.

R.: (to Grey) Mr. Grey, I’d like to introduce Mr. Smith, a friend of mine.

G.: How do you do, Mr. Smith? Pleased to meet you.

S.: How do you do, Mr. Grey? I’m also very glad to know you.

2.

G.: Are you acquainted with James Richardson? No? Then let me introduce you to him. HeyJames, meet my roommate, Bill Jackson. By the way, he is a great basketball player!

R.: Hi, Bill! Nice to meet you. We have just been talking about last night’s basketball game. What do you think about it?

3.

T.: Oh, my! Look at the time! I’m afraid I must say good-bye now. I really must be going. I didn’t realize how late it was.

B.: Won’t you stay a little longer?

T.: I’d like to, but I’m afraid to be late for my train. You know, I live in the country.

B.: Well, then I won’t keep you any longer. Drop by again sometime.

T.: Thanks, I will. I’ve enjoyed the evening very much. Good-bye!

B.: Come any time you like. I’ll be delighted to see you. Good-bye!

Ex. 9. Discuss the models of address existing in different countries and compare them with the forms we use in Russia. The questions below will help you.

  1. What is patronymic?

  2. How do you show respect for position and seniority?

  3. Do you ever address a person just with his or her surname?

  4. When addressing a woman, do you distinguish between a married and an unmarried woman?

  5. How do you address a shop assistant or a bus conductor, and how do they address their customers?

  6. What forms of address seem unusual to Russians? What do you think would sound strange to foreigners in Russian mode of addressing people?

Ex. 10. Role playing.

Imagine that you’ve met a foreigner at a party. Make an acquaintance and short conversation with him/her. Following questions will help you.

  1. Is this your first visit to…?

  2. Where are you from?

  3. How long are you going to stay?

  4. What is the aim of your visit?

  5. How do you like our…?

  6. What do you think of…?

  7. What places would you like to visit?

  8. What places have you already visited?

Ex. 11. Writing practice

Write a one-page essay describing:

1) How you made friends with your best friend;

2) How you usually get acquainted with smb.

Supplementary reading

How to Say Good-bye

In English they often say things in many different ways. One good example of this is what they say when they are leaving someone. The usual form is “good-bye”, but you may hear many variations of this. “Bye-bye” is the most common, but this can also be shortened to “bye”. If someone is in a hurry, they often don’t say “good-bye” completely, but say what they are going to do: “Must go”; “I’ve got to be going”; “Can’t wait”; “Must dash”; “There’s work to do”. The most popular expression seem to be “See you” or “So long”.

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