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M O D U L E # 1

Unit 1. My Future Profession

(Management of Public Catering)

1 . R e a d a n d learn t h e f o l l o w i n g w o r d s a n d w o r d

c o m b i n a t i o n s :

to t r a i n - roxyBara, iiaBHaxn;

e x p e r t - q)axiBenb:

e.g.

An

expert is

one

who

is

very skillful

or well-informed in

some

special

field.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

a c c o u n t i n g -

O6JIJK;

GyxnuixepcbKHH O6JIJK; 3Bixnicxb;

 

a u d i t -

ncpcßipi<a, pcBJ3ia

öyxrajiTcpcbKux KHHF;

 

c y b e r n e t i c s

- i<i6cpHCxni<a:

 

 

 

 

 

 

e.g.

 

Cybernetics

is

the

comparative

study

of electronic calculating

machines

 

and

the

human

nervous

system.

 

 

 

public c a t e r i n g -

rpoMaflCbice

xapnyBaHHJi;

 

 

c a t e r i n g t r a d e - p c c x o p a n n a c n p a ß a ;

 

 

 

to m a j o r

in

- cncniaiiriyBaxHCb;

 

 

 

 

c a t e r i n g

e s t a b l i s h m e n t - xapHOBHÖ 3aKJia/i;

 

 

e.g.

 

Lviv's

"kavyarnya "

is

a

kind

of catering establishment

which

is famous not only in Ukraine but in the world as well.

food a n d

b e v e r a g e

i n d u s t r y - xapHOBa npoMHonoBicrb;

lo c o m p l y

w i t h

-

BHKOHyBa™;

t l c m a n d s

of t h e t i m e - BHMOIH n a c y ;

people's livin g

s t a n d a r d - HCHTTEBHH p i ß e n b naccjicHHa;

e.g. Rising people's living standards in Ukraine is the demands of

tlw time.

lo m a s t e r - B,aocKonanioBaxn;

m o n i t o r i n g — KOIIIpojib, n c p e ß i p K a ;

e.g. Managers are

generally

responsible for

all

of the administrative

Und human resource

functions,

of running

the

business including

recruiting new employees and monitoring employee performance and

training.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

globalization

-

nioöajiiiaubi;

 

 

 

 

 

 

i n n o v a t i o n

- iimoBaum;

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

e.g.

Innovation

 

can

mean

a

new

method,

custom,

device or

something

new.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

to

be r e s p o n s i b l e for

-BißnoBißäTH

3a;

 

 

 

 

e.g.

Food

service

managers

 

are

responsible for

the daily

operations

of restaurants

 

and

other

catering

establishments.

 

 

to

s e r v e m e a l s

a n d

b e v e r a g e s

-

no/uiBaTu

I>KV Ta

H a n o i ;

 

c u s t o m e r

-

KJiifur;

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

to

c o o r d i n a t e - KOopAHHyBara;

 

 

 

 

 

d i n i n g r o o m — Y;j.ajibiiM,

syn: c a n t e e n ;

 

 

 

b a n q u e t

- 6am<eT; 3B3HHH o6i/i;

 

 

 

 

to

e n s u r e -

iaöcmetiyisani;

 

 

 

 

 

 

to

o v e r s e e

{past o v e r s a w ;

/;.

o v e r s e e n ) - HaniswaTH;

 

i n v e n t o r y

- hiBCirrap; ornic Marina; r o n a p n ;

 

 

h u m a n - r e s o u r c e s

-

JiKmcbKi

p e c y p c n ;

 

 

 

to r u n a b u s i n e s s - Ma™ 6 n u c c , Kcpyisa™ (l)ipMoio, cnpaBOio, 6i3HecoM;

 

 

e.g.

A

lot

of my

school-mates

run

their

own

business.

 

 

 

to

e n h a n c e

efficiency

a n d

p r o d u c t i v i t y -

36ijH>inyBaiH/ni/iBHuiyBaTH

 

 

C([)CKTMBnicTI» Ta IipO/iyKTHBHlCTb;

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

to

t r a c k

o r d e r s ,

etc . -

cjiuiKyBani

$a

iaMOBJienHJiMH i T.i.;

 

 

 

 

e.g.

Many

restaurants use

computers

to

track

orders,

inventory

and

the

seating

of patrons.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

p a t r o n -

i o i i e i u ;

s y n :

client,

c u s t o m e r ;

 

 

 

 

 

to

 

recruit

- naiiiviain, G p a n i

na

p o G o r y ; s y n : to

h i r e , to

e m p l o y ;

 

e m e r g e n c y

 

K p a i i n i c n , ;

iiciicpcnGaMeiiHÜ Buria/ioic;

 

 

 

 

 

e.g.

Emergency

is

a

sudden,

 

generally

unexpected

occurrence

demanding

immediate

action.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

on

s h o r t n o t i c e

B KOpc-TKHH Tcprviiii, o/ipa.sy;

 

 

 

 

to

be

liable

for

niuiioni,u;ii n 3a; syn: to

be r e s p o n s i b l e

for;

 

 

 

e.g.

C

'hefs

de cuisine

are liable for

all

operations at the

kitchen

and

the

work

of the

personnel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

to be

liable (to)

duty - oOKJiaaaTHCb MHTOM: Being at customs one must

know

that

cigarettes,

 

alcoholic

beverages,

precious

metals

and gold

are liable to duty.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

d i s c o v e r y — BiflKpurra;

 

 

 

 

 

 

e.g.

The

discovery

of a

new

dish does

more for

human

happiness

than

the

discovery of a

new

star.

 

 

 

 

d i v e r s e -

praHHÖ;

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

u n a m b i g u o u s

- HJTKHH;

ant: a m b i g u o u s .

 

 

 

2 . R e a d

a n d

translat e

t h e text:

 

 

 

My Future Profession (Management of Public Catering)

I am a student of Chernivtsi Trade and Economics Institute. Our Institute trains experts in many specialities: international economics, accounting and auditing, finance and crediting, management and marketing, economic cybernetics. I study at the Faculty of Economics and Management majoring in management of catering establishments. To comply with the demand of the time, we, the students of Chernivtsi Trade and Economics

Institute, must do our best to master our future profession.

My future profession is management of catering establishments, famous British writer Virginia Woolf said that one cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well. Nowadays the standards of food and beverage industry services are rather high. The reasons are

l he process of globalization that affects all spheres of human society,

new level of people's living standard, and innovations brought to cookeiy by new technologies. Any work is becoming more and more demanding, ami it means that a manager is now responsible for more duties than before. Food service managers are responsible for the daily operations i if restaurants and other establishments that prepare and serve meals and beverages to customers. Besides coordinating activities among various departments, such as kitchen, dining room, and banquet operations, food ,ri vice managers ensure that customers are satisfied with their dining

I Kperience. In addition, they oversee the inventory and ordering of food,

I quipment, and supplies and arrange for the routine maintenance and

Upkeep of the restaurant, its equipment, and facilities. Managers are generally responsible for all of the administrative and human-resource

fUnclions of running the business, including

recruiting new employees

Hid monitoring employee performance and

training.

9

 

8

Technology influences the jobs of food service managers in many ways, enhancing efficiency and productivity. M a n y restaurants use computers to track orders, inventory, and the seating of patrons. Food service managers use the Internet to track industry news, find recipes, conduct market research, purchase supplies or equipment, recruit employees, and train staff. Internet access also makes service to customers more efficient. At many restaurants managers are liable for Web sites that include menus and online promotions, provide information about the restaurant location, and offer patrons the option to make a reservation.

Managers should be calm, flexible, and able to work through emergencies in order to ensure everyone's safety. Managers also should be able to fill in for absent workers on short notice and perform duties of other staff of the restaurant. Many people nowadays travel in order to get acquainted with new cultures and Ihey say that the discovery of a new dish docs more for human happiness than the discovciy of a new star. That is why managers must be good communicators. They need to speak well several languages with diverse clients and staff from different countries. Managers also must ensure that written supply orders are clear and unambiguous. That is why their knowledge of foreign languages must be perfect.

Most employers emphasize personal qualities when hiring managers. For example, self-discipline, initiative, and leadership ability are essential. But training and knowledge in different spheres arc not less important. That is why we must study hard to achieve goals setup by the requirements of our future profession.

3 . A n s w e r t h e f o l l o w i n g q u e s t i o n s :

1.Where do you study?

2.What is your future profession?

3.Why arc the standards of food and beverage industry services rather

high'.'

4.What is a manager now responsible for?

5.What departments does a manager coordinate?

6. How docs technology influence the jobs of managers of public catering?

7. Why do managers of public catering use the Internet?

8.Are many restaurants managers liable for Web sites?

9.What features should a good manager possess?

10.Why is it important for a manager to know at least one foreign language?

4 . G i v e Ukrainian

e q u i v a l e n t s o f t h e

f o l l o w i n g :

 

 

experts, c y b e r n e t i c s ,

c a t e r i n g ,

to m a j o r in,

to m a s t e r o n e ' s

speciality,

b e v e r a g e , to be r e s p o n s i b l e

for,

d a i l y o p e r a t i o n s ,

to e n s u r e ,

to o b s e r v e ,

r o u t i n e m a i n t e n a n c e ,

t o run

th e

b u s i n e s s , t o

track

o r d e r s ,

c o n d u c t m a r k e t

r e s e a r c h , p u r c h a s e , recruit

e m p l o y e e s , Internet a c c e s s , to

be

liable

5 . G i v e E n g l i s h e q u i v a l e n t s of t h e f o l l o w i n g :

JiocHniyTH MCTH, BHMorw, xapHOBHfi rjaKJiazt, 3nanHH iHOiCMiinx MOB, rapimfi CIUBPO3MOBHHK, pi3ni KJUCHTH, Buriaxifl HOBOI CTpaBH, m r a r p e c i o p a i i y , niyHKHH, ncriepcaoaucHiiH Bnna/iOK, ripaBo Bnöopy, ziocTyn

;io I n T c p i i c T y , n o c n j i i o B a T H , n i i i K p c c j i i O B a T H , KOHTpojiioBaTH,

icoopflHHyBaiH /lisuibnicTb, pißeiib HCHTTJI, IICCTH BuinoBi/uuibriicTb

6 . W h i c h o f t h e f o l l o w i n g w o r d s are s y n o n y m s ;

find

w o r d s tha t

are

u s e d i n t h e text:

to t r a i n ,

to manage,

food,

to r e s t o r e , t a x , a m b i g u o u s , w o r k , duty ,

k n o w l e d g e , e m p l o y m e n t , o c c u p a t i o n , t o t e a c h , s c i e n c e , b u s i n e s s , t o Control, nutrition, to regain , to e d u c a t e , to instruct, doubtful , indefinite, diet

7 . M a k e t h e f o l l o w i n g s e n t e n c e s c o m p l e t e

by translatin g t h e p h r a s e s in b r a c k e t s :

1 . I s t u d y at t h e F a c u l t y of E c o n o m i c s a n d M a n a g e m e n t

(cneuiajii3yrouHCb y MciiezpKMein i TCXHOJiorii x a p u y B a n n a ) .

2. (Ul,o6 BÜuiOBUurrn BHMoraM i i a c y ) th e s t u d e n t s m u s t do their best to m a s t e r their speciality .

I.

f a m o u s British writer Virginia Woolf s a i d that one c a n n o t Qioöpe

 

flyMäTH, jiioÖHTH i c n a ™ , JHCUJO Bin jxoGpc lie noo6irum).

I

Any w o r k is b e c o m i n g m o r e a n d m o r e d e m a n d i n g (i u,c omaMae, uio

 

cyi iacHHH MCHCzpKep Ucee Gijibujy BianoBUUiJibnicrb 3apa3 ni>i< ne

 

Gyjio p a n i i n e ) .

 

>

f o o d service m a n a g e r s ar e responsibl e for daily operation s (pccTopaniß

 

ia iuuiHX xapnoBnx 3ai<jia;uB, mo oocnyroByjoxb KJiitHTiB).

'i

(Bararo pccTopaiii ß

Kopneryioibcsi KOMii'iOTcpaMn) to track o r d e r s ,

 

inventory, and the

s e a t i n g of p a t r o n s .

/(Meiie;i>Kcpii noBHHiii 6yrn BnrpnMaiiHMH, myuKHMH i 3;UITHHMH BiipiuiyBaTH HenepcaöanyBaHi e n r y a u i i ) in o r d e r to ensur e e v e r y o n e ' s

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safety.

8. Many people nowadays travel to get acquainted with new cultures and they say that (m-maxi/i hoboi crpaBH poGwrb jnoflMHy 6ijibin

macjiHBOK), a ni>i< BuiKpnrni hoboi 3ipKH).

9. (EijibiuicTb poöoTO/uuuiiB iiajuuoi'b n c p c B a r y ) personal qualities when

hiring managers.

10. That is why their (uianiui ino'SCMUHX MOB UOBUHHO 6yrn flOCKOHanHM).

8 . Put

q u e s t i o n s t o t h e w o r d s i n t h e italics:

 

1. The

students of our group major in management

of catering

establishments.

 

2. The

process of globalization affects all spheres of human

society.

3. Food service managers are responsible for the daily operations of

restaurants

and other

catering establishments.

4. Technology

influences

the jobs offood service managers in many ways.

5.Many restaurants use computers to track orders, inventory, and the seating of patrons.

6.Many Web sites provide information about famous restaurants, include menus, and offer patrons the option to make a reservation.

7.Managers who speak several foreign languages can easily communicate

with people of various countries.

9 . Learn t h e f o l l o w i n g definitions :

1)TO 'MSMMft.Q'L - administer or run something: to be in charge of something such as a store, department, or project and be responsible for its smooth running and for any personnel employed.

2)fyfA9{A(j'E9i>['LW administration of business: the organizing and controlling of the affairs of a business or a particular sector of a business.

3)9v(!AcXft(i'l'-'K:- somebody who manages business: somebody who

is responsible for directing and controlling the personnel of a business, or of a particular department within a business.

4) < My\, }{MfL%l9iL- relating to manager: involving or characteristic of a manager or management, especially in business.

5) C.ÄTE'Jil'Äli; 7ST.WLis:'fM'mfr- a unit which provides food and

services to its clients.

6) 'J^LS'f'^lil'Kß'H'' a place where meals can be bought and eaten.

12

10. R e a d

a n d d r a m a t i z e t h e f o l l o w i n g d i a l o g u e :

Nick: Oh,

hello. Happy to see you again.

Ann: I am happy to see you too. What are you doing here in Chernivtsi?

Nick: I am a student of Chernivtsi Trade and Economics Institute.

Ann: That's great! I also study here. I study at the Economics and

Management Faculty majoring in public catering. What is your future profession?

Nick: Oh, you know that I am crazy about computers. I decided to choose economic cybernetics. This speciality enables me to get a perspective job using my knowledge of computer systems. Why have you chosen

public catering?

Ann: I want to become a restaurant manager in future. This job will give me pleasure of communicating with different patrons, discovering new cuisines, creating cozy atmosphere in a restaurant. Probably, I'll

manage to run my own cafe.

Nick: It would be splendid. I wish you good luck!

Ann: N o w 1 have to go to the library to get ready to classes. Good bye. Nick: See you soon.

11. R e a d t h e s t o r y a n d c h o o s e c o r r e c t a n s w e r :

SIR ISAAC N E W T O N DINKS O F F NOTHING

Isaac Newton (1642 — 1727), the greatest scientist, was often so deep in his own thoughts that he would forget to eat his dinner unless

reminded to do so.

One day a friend came to dine with him. Dinner was put on the table

bill Newton did not come out of his study.

I lis friend, who was used to Newton's peculiar ways, sat down and \\ aitcd for him. At last he decided that Newton was so deep in some new

iheory that he had forgotten the time.

I le therefore helped himself to the chicken which was on the table.

W hen he had finished he thought he would play a trick on his friend. He

I nrcfully put all the chicken bones back on the dish and covered them

uiih a silver

cover. Then

he left

Newton's

house

and went about his

IMI'.mess.

 

 

 

 

 

S e v e r a l

hours later,

Newton

came out

of his

study feeling v e r y

liiiiiri V I le saw the table set ready for dinner and sat down at his place. 13

When he lifted the cover and saw the bones and the remains of the chicken, he was quite surprised. He turned and looked at the clock and saw that it was long past his usual time for dinner.

"Well, well," he said to himself, "1 thought 1 had not yet dined, but 1 see 1 am mistaken."

And getting up from the table, he went back to his study and began to work again, quite satisfied that he had eaten his dinner at the usual hour but had forgotten all about it.

1.a) One day Isaac Newton came to his friend to dine with him.

b)One day a friend came to dine with Isaac Newton.

c)One day Isaac Newton and his friend met to dine together.

2.a) When dinner was put on the table Newton quickly came out of his study.

b)When dinner was put on the table Newton and his friend sat down at the table.

c) When dinner was put on the table Newton didn't come out of his study.

3.a) His friend had dinner without the host.

b)His friend left the house without dinner.

c)His friend asked Newton to join him.

4.a) His friend played the piano very well.

b)His friend played a trick on Newton.

c)It was Newton who played a trick on his friend.

5.a) He put a chicken on the plate and covered it.

b)He put chicken's bones on the plate and covered them,

e)He put hen's bones on the plate and covered them.

6.a) Several hours later Newton came out of his study because he remembered about his friend.

b)Several hours later Newton came out of his study because he was hungry.

c)Several hours later Newton cam e out of his study because he

remembered about his dinner.

7. a) Newton was surprised when he saw the remains of the chicken.

b)Newton appreciated his friend's joke.

c)Newton thought that it was his friend's trick.

14

8. a) Newton was satisfied that he had had his d i n n e r at u s u a l time. b) Newton was satisfied that he hadn't had his dinner at usual time.

c) Newton was satisfied that his friend was so original .

G r a m m a r (The N o u n : Plural F o r m s , P o s s e s s i v e C a s e )

I'xercise # 1. Give the plural forms of the following nouns:

a ) e x p e r t , e c o n o m y , m a n a g e r , s e r v i c e , b u s i n e s s ,

food , r e c i p e , p u r c h a s e ,

r e s t a u r a n t , l a n g u a g e , l e a d e r s h i p ;

 

b) loe, city, h e r o , p i a n o , calf, cliff, proof, chief,

bath , Negro, life, shelf,

berry, valley;

C)foot, ox, fox, man, German, woman, mouse, c h i l d , sheep, ship, goose, deer, cheese;

d )

crisis, p h e n o m e n o n , d a t u m ,

n u c l e u s ,

b a s i s , a p p a r a t u s , a n a l y s i s ;

o)

room-mate, b o y - m e s s e n g e r ,

onlooker ,

passer - by, sister-in-law, forget -

 

m e - n o t , m e r r y - g o - r o u n d .

 

 

Exercise # 2 State the number of the following nouns and give the

corresponding singular or plural, if any:

k n o w l e d g e , s c i e n c e , chalk,

a d v i c e ,

t o n g s , silver,

i n f o r m a t i o n , t r o u s e r s ,

progress,

n e w s , s p e c t a c l e s ,

g o o d s ,

e c o n o m i c s ,

p h y s i c s , m a t h e m a t i c s ,

w a g e s ,

s a n a t o r i a , mice, fish

 

 

Exercise # 3 Translate into English

I. Meni n o T p i ö n a nopa.ua y uin cnpain. 2. H o M y BH H e x r y t T c i i o r o

f l o p a f l a M H ? 3. Baraxo 3 Bauinx nopa.ii 6yjm /iy>Kc K o p n c m i M H . 4. lie HC

MOi i poini . 5. CKÜH>KH B TC6C rpoujcfi? - Y MCHC Majio rpoiuefi; i'x HC

nm i n u m b mo6 KyiiHTM T C J i C ß i 3 o p . 6. Horo 3nanHH y rajiy3i CKOIIOMJKH 111>.111uivi nac . 7. Bauin x j u a r i b HCAOCTariibo, ino6 n p a i u o B a T H

MCiie;t>i<epoM. 8. >li<a u i i o B a p o ö o T a ! 9. 51 ,ay>KC pa^im BanmM ycnixaM .

10

>lk'y HOBIiJiy BH H'dM IipHHCCJlH? 1 1. l\l H0BHHH H3M B>KC BlJIOlvri.

12.

\n i

liiini roBop>iTb,

mo i m i K n x

IIOBHH - nafiKpauia n o B u u a .

 

I ncreise # 4

Replace the of-phrase

by

the

noun

in

the

possessive

 

 

case

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I

I he

k n o w l e d g e

of s t u d e n t s ;

the w o r k

of a

m a n a g e r ;

the

t e c h n o l o g y

of our

chefs ; the

lectur e of a

professor;

(hc

rights

of w o m e n .

 

1

A d i s t a n c e

of t w o m i l e s ; the

c r e w

of t h e ship; the

s t o c k e x c h a n g e

of

I

ontlon; an

interval of three

h o u r s ;

th e

oil

d e p o s i t s of the

w o r l d ;

the

 

 

 

 

 

15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When he lifted the cover and saw the bones and the remains of the chicken, he was quite surprised. He turned and looked at the clock and saw that it was long past his usual time for dinner.

"Well, well," he said to himself, "I thought 1 had not yet dined, but I see 1 am mistaken."

And getting up from the table, hc went back to his study and began to work again, quite satisfied that hc had eaten his dinner at the usual hour but had forgotten all about it.

1.a) One day Isaac Newton came to his friend to dine with him.

b)One day a friend came to dine with Isaac Newton.

c)One day Isaac Newton and his friend met to dine together.

2.a) When dinner was put on the table Newton quickly came out of his study.

b)When dinner was put on the table Newton and his friend sat down at the table.

c)When dinner was put on the table Newton didn't come out of his

study.

3.a) His friend had dinner without the host.

b)His friend left the house without dinner.

c)His friend asked Newton to join him.

4.a) His friend played the piano very well.

b)His friend played a trick on Newton.

c)It was Newton who played a trick on his friend.

5.a) Hc put a chicken on the plate and covered it.

b)Hc put chicken's bones on the plate and covered them,

e)He put hen's bones on the plate and covered them.

6.a) Several hours later Newton came out of his study because he remembered about his friend.

b)Several hours later Newton came out of his study because hc was hungry.

c)Several hours later Newton cam e out of his study because he

remembered about his dinner.

7. a) Newton was surprised when hc saw the remains of the chicken.

b)Newton appreciated his friend's joke.

c)Newton thought that it was his friend's trick.

S .

a) Newton was

satisfied

that hc h a d h a d his d i n n e r at usua l time .

 

b) Newton

w a s

satisfied

that

hc

h a d n ' t

ha d

his

dinner at usua l time .

 

c) Newton

was

satisfied

that

his

friend

w a s

so

original .

G r a m m a r (The

N o u n : Plural F o r m s ,

P o s s e s s i v e C a s e )

Exercise # 1. Give the plural forms of the following nouns:

a )

e x p e r t , e c o n o m y , m a n a g e r , s e r v i c e , b u s i n e s s , food, r e c i p e , p u r c h a s e ,

 

r e s t a u r a n t , l a n g u a g e , l e a d e r s h i p ;

 

 

 

b) toe, city, h e r o ,

p i a n o , calf, cliff,

proof, chief,

bath , Negro, life, shelf,

 

berry, v a l l e y ;

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C) foot, o x , fox, m a n , German, woman, m o u s e , child, s h e e p , ship, goose,

 

deer,

c h e e s e ;

 

 

(I)

crisis,

p h e n o m e n o n , d a t u m ,

n u c l e u s ,

b a s i s , a p p a r a t u s , a n a l y s i s ;

e)

r o o m - m a t e , b o y - m e s s e n g e r ,

o n l o o k e r ,

p a s s e r - b y , sister - in - law, forget-

 

m e - n o t , m e r r y - g o - r o u n d .

 

 

Exercise # 2 State the number of the following nouns and give the

corresponding singular or plural, if any:

k n o w l e d g e , s c i e n c e , chalk,

a d v i c e ,

t o n g s , silver, information, trousers ,

progress, n e w s , s p e c t a c l e s ,

g o o d s ,

e c o n o m i c s , p h y s i c s , m a t h e m a t i c s ,

Wages, sanatoria , m i c e , fish

 

 

Exercise # 3 Translate into English

I. Meni n o T p i 6 n a nopa.ua y irin cnpaisi. 2. Hoivry BH H c x r y r r c iioro

uiipauaMH? 3. Eararo 3 BauiHX nopa.ii 6yjm JV/SKC KopncHHMH. 4. Lie HC

mi ! poiui . 5. CidxibKH B rc6c rpoinefi ? - Y MCHC iviano r p o i n e n ; i'x HC

MIU i auHTb mo6 KyriHTi-i TCJiCBi3op. 6. Horo 3nainui y rajiy3i CKOHOMIKH

up,i t i u i u i i a c . 7 . Bauiu x i i i a u b H e / r o c r a i H b o , m o 6 n p a w o B a x H

iwriKVPKcpoM. 8. 5h<:a uiicaBa po6oxa! 9. 51 /iy>i<c pa/rnfi B a u i H M ycnixaivi.

In

Micy iioBiniy BH HaM n p n u c c j i H ? 11. Uj HOBHHH H a M B>KC BI/IOML 12.

\m

uifiiij roBopjiTb, mo HUIKHX HOBHH - liafiKpauia noBHiia.

I

w i eise # 4 Replace the of-phrase by

the

noun

in

the possessive

 

 

case

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I

The

k n o w l e d g e

of s t u d e n t s ;

th e w o r k

of a

m a n a g e r ;

the t e c h n o l o g y

 

Of our

c h e f s ; the

lecture

of a

p r o f e s s o r ;

the

rights

of w o m e n .

I

A d i s t a n c e of t w o m i l e s ;

th e c r e w oflhe ship; the

s t o c k e x c h a n g e of

 

I inn Ion; an interval of thre e

h o u r s ; t h e

oil

d e p o s i t s of th e w o r l d ; t h e

14

1 5

rays of the sun; the population of England.

3. The mother of Mary and Ann; the fathers of Peter and John; the

p o e m s of Byron and Shelly; the children of my sister Jane; the s p e e c h of the Minister of Foreign Affairs.

Exercise # 5 Replace the possessive case by a prepositional g r o u p where possible

1.Everybody was impressed by the manager's skills.

2.The members of Slate examination board were satisfied with students'

answers.

3. A young waiter got his first week's salary and looked very proud. 4. In these days he lived, for economy's sake, in a little town.

5. We were struck by yesterday's news.

Exercise # 6 Translate into English

ripnöyTTH nocjia YicpaiHH B Bcjim<o6pHTanüo; c r p a B U HanionaJibHoi

Kyxni; O6OB'>I3KH CTy;icnriB n a u i o r o

By3y; r a p H a p c n y T a u i n uboro

p e c T o p a H y ; K c p y B a u n j i ncpcoriajioivi

x a p w o B o r o s a K / i a ^ y ; na6yTT>i

HaBHHOK MonoflHMH cnema/iicTaMH .

 

Unit 2. Cookery

1 . R e a d a n d learn t h e f o l l o w i n g w o r d s a n d w o r d

c o m b i n a t i o n s :

c o o k e r y

- icyjiiiiapiji, npuroryBaHiiH

b i d ;

e.g.

Cookery is

the

ort

or practice of cooking food for consumption.

to cook - to p r e p a r e

food

by

b o i l i n g ,

b a k i n g , frying, etc .

a cook — o n e w h o p r e p a r e s m e a l s ;

 

e.g. Too many cooks spoil the broth.

consumption — cnoacHBaima;

to consume - I) cno>KHBaTn; 2) l e r n ;

(<>ii surner — c n o a c H B a n ;

consumer goods —

cno>KiiBi n

T O B a p w ;

 

 

essential

-

JCTOTHHH;

 

 

 

 

 

n t s

a n d

crafts - p c M c c j i o ;

 

 

 

 

 

e.g.

 

We know

arts and

crafts to

be

well-developed in the

Middle

Ages.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

onset

- no'iaroK;

s y n : heginning;

 

 

 

N e o l i t h i c

p e r i o d

- H c o J i i x m i n H i i

u c p i o A (HaHflaBniuiHÖ

n e p i o z t

 

K a M ' a n o r o ßik'y);

 

 

 

 

 

humans - JIIOHM; syn : people;

 

 

 

 

e.g.

To err is

human.

 

 

 

 

i ;nv

- ci-ipnri; nc/JOBapcnnH; HC/IOIICMCHHH; ne;iocMa >Keiinfi;

 

i n s e c t -

KOMaxa;

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hume - j u i H H i i a ;

 

 

 

 

 

 

p o t t e r y

-

Mcpen'«HHH

n o c y u ;

 

 

 

imbcrs - pi. rap>mnii

noniji ;

>i<apniiKii;

 

 

in roast civia>KHTM na BÜiKpiiro.viy BOIHJ;

 

 

must

CMa>KCHC M'>ICO;

 

 

 

 

muster

>KapoBiiH,

nin ;

 

 

 

 

i ousting

-

cMa>KennH y n o r o u j rapjiMoro noBixp«;

 

fOUSting-jack - po>KCH;

 

 

 

 

to

s l c a m

 

- BapHTH

na n a p i ;

 

 

 

 

\u

timing

-

o6po6io i

n a p o i o , npnroTyBaHHa

CTpaB na n a p i ;

 

ItOil in

 

u a p a ;

 

 

 

 

 

 

16

17

steaming table - M a p M i T (NI/FIRPIßAIOMA uiacba y FAAJIBMIX Ta

PECTOPAIIAX);

to braise - TyuiKyBaTH;

braise - TyuncoBanc M'MCO;

braising - ryni icy Banna;

to boil - BapnTH;

boil - KUNIUMI;

boiled - BapeHHH;

boiled dinner - AM. c r p a B a 3 M ' a c a Ta OBOMIB, rymKOBanHX B KOTJH;

boiler - n a p o ß n r i KOTCJI, KUN'ATHJIBHHK;

boiling - BiflBaproBanua;

to stew - TyuiKyBaTu;

stew - ryniKOBanc M'HCO;

stewing — TyuiKyBaHHfl, mo noHHuatTbca y xojioflHifl BO/H, flOBO/tHTboi

no K u n u m a Ha MaJioMy BOTHI I ne NOBHHNO CHJIBHO KNNITH;

stewed — TyiliKOBaHHH ;

stew-pan - KaCTpyna, COTCHIUIK; syn: stewpot;

to fry - CMa>KH'ra;

fry -

CMa>Kcnc M ' a c o ;

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

frying

-

CMa>i<eHHa y

r a p a n o M y

>Kiipi in

oni'i;

 

 

 

 

frying-pan - ci<OBopo;ia, naTeJibHa;

 

 

 

 

 

to bake

-

IICKTH;

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

bakehouse

-

ncKapua; syn:

bakery;

 

 

 

 

 

baking

-

BHNIKANNA;

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

baker

- nei<ap, 6yjiOHiiHK; baker's dozen

MopiOBa m o w H H a ;

 

 

husk

-iiyninnHa, ujKipi<a; oöropnca;

 

 

 

 

 

domestication of animals

npnpyMcnnji TBapnn;

 

 

 

 

cultivation - po3Be,NCIHIH, KyribTHByBaiiua (pocjinn);

 

 

 

 

e.g.

 

New techniques,

such

as boiling, stewing,

braising, frying,

and

baking, in combination with the

domestication of animals for their meat

and milk and the cultivation of

plants, opened way

to

modern

cookery.

primary - n cp BH 1111 M H;

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

primary techniques

OCIIOBIU

rcxnojiorii ;

 

 

 

 

secondary techniques - j m y r o p a m i i , flonoMiacHi TEXNOJIORII;

 

 

e.g.

 

Both

primary

and

secondary techniques are very

important

in

the

art

 

of

cookery.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

chores - /lOMaiuni O6OB'H3KH;

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18

 

 

 

 

 

utensils - KyxoiuiHH nocy/i;

property - BnacTHBicn», HKicn>; xapajcrcpu a OCO6JIHBICN>;

constituent - CICNA/iOBa NACTHIIA;

fats - >i<npn;

protein - xi.u. nporci'ii, GUIOK;

carbohydrate - ByracBon;

e.g.

 

The

constituents

of any food

are proteins, fats,

carbohydrates,

minerals,

 

and

vitamins.

 

 

 

to thicken - irymaTu;

 

 

 

flavour

- a p o M a r ; 3anax; NPNCMHUH CM3K; npncMaic;

 

digestibility

- nerKOTpaBHicrb;

 

 

digestible

-

JiencoTpaBHHfi;

mo JICPKO

3acBOioeTbca;

 

digestion

-

 

TpaBJicnna;

 

 

 

digestive

-

1) TpaBnufi; mo

e n p n a e TPABJIENMO 2) 3aci6,

mo ENPNAE

rpaBJicHHio;

 

 

 

 

tO cause - CNPHHHHHTH, BHKJIHKaTH;

 

 

acceptable -

npHCMHHH, 6a>KAIIHH;

 

 

nutrient

-

no>KHBna pcuoBnna;

 

 

nutriment

-

I>Ka, x a p n ; KopM;

 

 

nutrition - ro/iyBanna; xapuyBanuji ; >KIIBJICHH>I; i>Ka;

nutritious - ITO>KHBIIHH;

nutritive - 1) no>KHBHA pcL IOBINIA; 2) HO>KHBHHH, xapuoBnu; haute cuisine - BHUiyKana Kyxna.

R e a d a n d t r a n s l a t e

t h e

text:

C o o k e r y

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cookery is p r e p a r a t i o n of food for consumption. It is the oldest and

most essential of all arts

a n d

crafts. Cookery

a p p e a r e d in

t i m e of fire

Hilling onset d u r i n g the

Neolithic

period . Until they learned to

m a k e

11id contro l fire, h u m a n s

ate

t h e i r

food raw,

m o s t l y wild

fruits,

nuts ,

Insects, fish, a n d g a m e .

Before th e d e v e l o p m e n t of pottery s o m e 7,000

i''l

1,000

y e a r s a g o , food

w a s c o o k e d

by r o a s t i n g

it

over o p e n fire,

or by

rapping

it

in l e a v e s

or

h u s k a n d

s t e a m i n g

it

o v e r e m b e r s .

The

ill \

e l o p m e n t

of p o t t e r y m a d e

p o s s i b l e suc h c o o k i n g

m e t h o d s as

boiling ,

Ii

u mi',

braising , frying, a n d

b a k i n g . These t e c h n i q u e s ,

in c o m b i n a t i o n

ill)

the

d o m e s t i c a t i o n

of

a n i m a l s

for t h e i r m e a t

a n d

m i l k

a n d

th e

llltivation of p l a n t s , o p e n e d w a y to m o d e r n c o o k e r y .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

19

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cookery includes a variety of primary techniques (application of dry heat, contact with heated liquids or fats, smoking, etc.) Secondary cookery techniques range from the simplest kitchen chores to the decoration of ceremonies. But one should know not only cooking methods and kitchen utensils to master this art: physical and chemical properties

of food are also of great importance. The constituents of any food are protein, fat, carbohydrates, minerals and vitamins. Each of them plays

an important role in cooking: protein thickens and binds together other food materials, fats give flavour and richness to food, minerals and vitamins arc necessary for people and must be preserved. Heat causes

physical and chemical changes in

food. It makes the flavour and

digestibility of the raw product more

acceptable and usually results in

the loss of nutrients.

 

Cookery must be divided into two classes - home cooking and haute

cuisine. The distinction is based on the differences between practical cooking skills and refined art.

3 . A n s w e r t h e f o l l o w i n g q u e s t i o n s :

1. What is cookery?

2. What can you say about origin of cookery?

3.

How did people cook before pottery was invented?

4.

What major techniques of cookery do you know?

5.

What opened way to modern cookery?

6.Why arc protein and fats important for cookery?

7.What arc primary techniques?

8.What techniques arc called secondary?

9.What are the main physical and chemical changes caused by heat?

10.What is the difference between home cookery and haute cuisine?

4 . Give Ukrainian e q u i v a l e n t s o f t h e f o l l o w i n g w o r d s a n d

w o r d - c o m b i n a t i o n s :

cookery, consumption, arts and crafts, Neolithic period, insects, game, roasting, to wrap, embers, pottery, boiling, stewing, braising, frying, baking, domestication of animals, cultivation of plants, primary techniques, utensils, to master

20

5 . G i v e E n g l i s h e q u i v a l e n t s o f t h e f o l l o w i n g w o r d s a n d w o r d - c o m b i n a t i o n s a n d m a k e s e n t e n c e s o f y o u r o w n with t h e m :

lipi-ICMHHH, CKJiaflOBa, 6ÜIKM, >KHpH, Byi'JICBOHH, BixaMillH, TpaBJlCHHfl,

npHCMHHH CMaK, BHmyi<ana KyxHH, (}>i3M'iHi ra xiMimii 3MIHH, noacHBiii

pc'IOBMHH, flOMaillHi O6OB'H3KH, CITpHHHHflXH, flyHCe Ba>KJTHBO

6. Fill in t h e b l a n k s with a p p r o p r i a t e w o r d s :

1. ... is preparation of food for consumption.

2, Until they

learned to make and control fire, ... ate their food raw

<

These techniques, in combination with ... opened way to modern

 

cookery.

 

 

 

I

( ' o o k c r y includes a variety of... techniques.

5

The ... of any food are protein, fat, carbohydrates, minerals and

 

vitamins.

 

 

 

6

Protein ... together other food materials.

/

Fats give ... to food.

 

8

I leat ... physical and chemical changes in food.

9

It

m a k e s the flavour and ... of the raw product more acceptable.

10

... comes from Latin "vita" which means "life".

/

I

earn t h e

f o l l o w i n g d e f i n i t i o n s

a n d m a k e up s e n t e n c e s

 

with t h e m :

 

 

 

 

R o a s t i n g

is the process of cooking (meat, etc.) over an open fire

"i m an oven.

 

 

 

 

F r y i n g

is the process of cooking in hot fat or oil.

 

 

B o i l i n g

is

the process of cooking

meal, fish, vegetables, fruit in

liter, and, consequently, suits a variety

of purposes.

 

 

S t e w i n g is a process of cooking m e a t which should be started in

• "1,1 water, then the water must be s l o w l y brought up to the boil but it III mid never boil fast.

B r a i s i n g is a process of browning (meat) and then simmering low ly (Syn. stewing). Braising is stewing in a more elaborate style of

i u n k i n g .

S m o k i n g is the process of curing meat, fish, etc. by smoking, i.e. ill. \ aporous matter arising from burning wood.

21

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