Добавил:
Опубликованный материал нарушает ваши авторские права? Сообщите нам.
Вуз: Предмет: Файл:

Principles and Applications of Asymmetric Synthesis

.pdf
Скачиваний:
92
Добавлен:
15.08.2013
Размер:
24.46 Mб
Скачать

Principles and Applications of Asymmetric Synthesis

Guo-Qiang Lin, Yue-Ming Li, Albert S.C. Chan

Copyright ( 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

ISBNs: 0-471-40027-0 (Hardback); 0-471-22042-6 (Electronic)

PRINCIPLES AND

APPLICATIONS OF

ASYMMETRIC SYNTHESIS

PRINCIPLES AND

APPLICATIONS OF ASYMMETRIC SYNTHESIS

Guo-Qiang Lin

Yue-Ming Li

Albert S. C. Chan

A JOHN WILEY & SONS, INC., PUBLICATION

New York . Chichester . Weinheim . Brisbane . Singapore . Toronto

Designations used by companies to distinguish their products are often claimed as trademarks. In all instances where John Wiley & Sons, Inc., is aware of a claim, the product names appear in initial capital or all capital letters. Readers, however, should contact the appropriate companies for more complete information regarding trademarks and registration.

Copyright ( 2001 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including uploading, downloading, printing, decompiling, recording or otherwise, except as permitted under Sections 107 or 108 of the 1976 United States Copyright Act, without the prior written permission of the Publisher. Requests to the Publisher for permission should be addressed to the Permissions Department, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 605 Third Avenue, New York, NY 10158-0012, (212) 850-6011, fax (212) 850-6008, E-Mail: PERMREQ @ WILEY.COM.

This publication is designed to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter covered. It is sold with the understanding that the publisher is not engaged in rendering professional services. If professional advice or other expert assistance is required, the services of a competent professional person should be sought.

ISBN 0-471-22042-6

This title is also available in print as ISBN 0-471-40027-0.

For more information about Wiley products, visit our web site at www.Wiley.com.

Dedicated to Professors Chung-Kwong Poon and Wei-Shan Zhou

CONTENTS

Preface

xiii

Abbreviations

xv

1 Introduction

1

1.1The Signi®cance of Chirality and Stereoisomeric

 

Discrimination

3

1.2

Asymmetry

7

 

1.2.1

Conditions for Asymmetry

7

 

1.2.2

Nomenclature

8

1.3

Determining Enantiomer Composition

16

 

1.3.1

Measuring Speci®c Rotation

17

 

1.3.2 The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Method

19

1.3.3Some Other Reagents for Nuclear Magnetic

Resonance Analysis

23

1.3.4Determining the Enantiomer Composition of Chiral

 

Glycols or Cyclic Ketones

24

1.3.5 Chromatographic Methods Using Chiral Columns

25

1.3.6 Capillary Electrophoresis with Enantioselective

 

 

Supporting Electrolytes

28

1.4 Determining Absolute Con®guration

29

1.4.1

X-Ray Di¨raction Methods

30

1.4.2

Chiroptical Methods

32

1.4.3 The Chemical Interrelation Method

35

1.4.4

Prelog's Method

36

1.4.5

Horeau's Method

39

1.4.6Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Method for Relative

 

 

Con®guration Determination

40

1.5

General Strategies for Asymmetric Synthesis

47

 

1.5.1

``Chiron'' Approaches

48

 

1.5.2

Acyclic Diastereoselective Approaches

49

 

1.5.3

Double Asymmetric Synthesis

53

1.6

Examples of Some Complicated Compounds

56

1.7Some Common De®nitions in Asymmetric Synthesis and

Stereochemistry

62

1.8 References

65

vii

viii

CONTENTS

 

2 a-Alkylation and Catalytic Alkylation of Carbonyl Compounds

71

2.1

Introduction

71

2.2

Chirality Transfer

73

 

2.2.1

Intra-annular Chirality Transfer

74

 

2.2.2

Extra-annular Chirality Transfer

78

 

2.2.3 Chelation-Enforced Intra-annular Chirality Transfer

79

2.3

Preparation of Quaternary Carbon Centers

98

2.4

Preparation of a-Amino Acids

103

2.5

Nucleophilic Substitution of Chiral Acetal

103

2.6Chiral Catalyst-Induced Aldehyde Alkylation: Asymmetric

Nucleophilic Addition

107

2.7Catalytic Asymmetric Additions of Dialkylzinc to Ketones:

 

Enantioselective Formation of Tertiary Alcohols

118

2.8

Asymmetric Cyanohydrination

118

2.9

Asymmetric a-Hydroxyphosphonylation

124

2.10

Summary

127

2.11

References

127

3 Aldol and Related Reactions

135

3.1

Introduction

135

3.2

Substrate-Controlled Aldol Reaction

138

3.2.1Oxazolidones as Chiral Auxiliaries: Chiral Auxiliary-

Mediated Aldol-Type Reactions

138

3.2.2 Pyrrolidines as Chiral Auxiliaries

142

3.2.3 Aminoalcohols as the Chiral Auxiliaries

145

3.2.4 Acylsultam Systems as the Chiral Auxiliaries

148

3.2.5 a-Silyl Ketones

150

3.3 Reagent-Controlled Aldol Reactions

150

3.3.1

Aldol Condensations Induced by Chiral Boron

 

 

Compounds

150

3.3.2

Aldol Reactions Controlled by Corey's Reagents

151

3.3.3Aldol Condensations Controlled by Miscellaneous

 

Reagents

154

3.4 Chiral Catalyst-Controlled Asymmetric Aldol Reaction

155

3.4.1

Mukaiyama's System

155

3.4.2

Asymmetric Aldol Reactions with a Chiral

 

 

Ferrocenylphosphine±Gold(I) Complex

159

3.4.3Asymmetric Aldol Reactions Catalyzed by Chiral

Lewis Acids

160

3.4.4Catalytic Asymmetric Aldol Reaction Promoted by

Bimetallic Catalysts: Shibasaki's System

163

3.5 Double Asymmetric Aldol Reactions

165

 

 

CONTENTS

ix

3.6

Asymmetric Allylation Reactions

167

 

3.6.1

The Roush Reaction

168

 

3.6.2

The Corey Reaction

174

 

3.6.3 Other Catalytic Asymmetric Allylation Reactions

175

3.7

Asymmetric Allylation and Alkylation of Imines

179

3.8

Other Types of Addition Reactions: Henry Reaction

186

3.9

Summary

188

3.10

References

188

4 Asymmetric Oxidations

195

4.1Asymmetric Epoxidation of Allylic Alcohols: Sharpless

 

Epoxidation

195

 

4.1.1 The Characteristics of Sharpless Epoxidation

197

 

4.1.2 Mechanism

199

 

4.1.3 Modi®cations and Improvements of Sharpless

 

 

Epoxidation

200

4.2

Selective Opening of 2,3-Epoxy Alcohols

204

 

4.2.1 External Nucleophilic Opening of 2,3-Epoxy Alcohols

205

 

4.2.2 Opening by Intramolecular Nucleophiles

207

 

4.2.3 Opening by Metallic Hydride Reagents

209

 

4.2.4 Opening by Organometallic Compounds

210

 

4.2.5 Payne Rearrangement and Ring-Opening Processes

211

 

4.2.6 Asymmetric Desymmetrization of meso-Epoxides

214

4.3

Asymmetric Epoxidation of Symmetric Divinyl Carbinols

217

4.4

Enantioselective Dihydroxylation of Ole®ns

221

4.5

Asymmetric Aminohydroxylation

232

4.6

Epoxidation of Unfunctionalized Ole®ns

237

4.6.1Catalytic Enantioselective Epoxidation of Simple

Ole®ns by Salen Complexes

237

4.6.2Catalytic Enantioselective Epoxidation of Simple

Ole®ns by Porphyrin Complexes

243

4.6.3Chiral Ketone±Catalyzed Asymmetric Oxidation of

Unfunctionalized Ole®ns

244

4.7 Catalytic Asymmetric Epoxidation of Aldehydes

249

4.8Asymmetric Oxidation of Enolates for the Preparation of

 

Optically Active a-Hydroxyl Carbonyl Compounds

250

 

4.8.1

Substrate-Controlled Reactions

251

 

4.8.2

Reagent-Controlled Reactions

252

4.9

Asymmetric Aziridination and Related Reactions

255

 

4.9.1

Asymmetric Aziridination

255

 

4.9.2 Regioselective Ring Opening of Aziridines

257

4.10

Summary

260

4.11

References

261

xCONTENTS

5 Asymmetric Diels-Alder and Other Cyclization Reactions

267

5.1

Chiral Dienophiles

268

 

5.1.1

Acrylate

269

 

5.1.2

a; b-Unsaturated Ketone

270

 

5.1.3

Chiral a; b-Unsubstituted N-Acyloxazolidinones

273

 

5.1.4 Chiral Alkoxy Iminium Salt

273

 

5.1.5 Chiral Sul®nyl-Substituted Compounds as

 

 

 

Dienophiles

277

5.2

Chiral Dienes

277

5.3

Double Asymmetric Cycloaddition

278

5.4

Chiral Lewis Acid Catalysts

279

 

5.4.1

Narasaka's Catalyst

280

 

5.4.2

Chiral Lanthanide Catalyst

282

 

5.4.3

Bissulfonamides (Corey's Catalyst)

282

 

5.4.4 Chiral Acyloxy Borane Catalysts

283

 

5.4.5 Brùnsted Acid±Assisted Chiral Lewis Acid Catalysts

285

 

5.4.6

Bis(Oxazoline) Catalysts

287

 

5.4.7 Amino Acid Salts as Lewis Acids for Asymmetric

 

 

 

Diels-Alder Reactions

289

5.5

Hetero Diels-Alder Reactions

290

 

5.5.1

Oxo Diels-Alder Reactions

290

 

5.5.2

Aza Diels-Alder Reactions

296

5.6Formation of Quaternary Stereocenters Through Diels-Alder

 

Reactions

301

5.7

Intramolecular Diels-Alder Reactions

301

5.8

Retro Diels-Alder Reactions

306

5.9

Asymmetric Dipolar Cycloaddition

308

5.10

Asymmetric Cyclopropanation

313

 

5.10.1 Transition Metal Complex±Catalyzed

 

 

Cyclopropanations

314

 

5.10.2 The Catalytic Asymmetric Simmons-Smith Reaction

319

5.11

Summary

322

5.12

References

323

6Asymmetric Catalytic Hydrogenation and Other Reduction

Reactions

331

6.1 Introduction

331

6.1.1Chiral Phosphine Ligands for Homogeneous

 

Asymmetric Catalytic Hydrogenation

332

6.1.2

Asymmetric Catalytic Hydrogenation of CbC Bonds

334

6.2 Asymmetric Reduction of Carbonyl Compounds

355

6.2.1

Reduction by BINAL±H

356

 

CONTENTS

xi

 

6.2.2 Transition Metal±Complex Catalyzed Hydrogenation

 

 

of Carbonyl Compounds

359

 

6.2.3 The Oxazaborolidine Catalyst System

367

6.3

Asymmetric Reduction of Imines

373

6.4

Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation

377

6.5

Asymmetric Hydroformylation

384

6.6

Summary

388

6.7

References

389

7Applications of Asymmetric Reactions in the Synthesis of Natural

Products

 

397

7.1

The Synthesis of Erythronolide A

397

7.2

The Synthesis of 6-Deoxyerythronolide

400

7.3

The Synthesis of Rifamycin S

403

 

7.3.1 Kishi's Synthesis in 1980

404

 

7.3.2 Kishi's Synthesis in 1981

408

 

7.3.3

Masamune's Synthesis

409

7.4

The Synthesis of Prostaglandins

412

 

7.4.1

Three-Component Coupling

414

 

7.4.2 Synthesis of the o-Side Chain

415

7.4.3The Enantioselective Synthesis of (R)-4-Hydroxy-2-

Cyclopentenone

417

7.5The Total Synthesis of TaxolÐA Challenge and Opportunity for Chemists Working in the Area of

 

Asymmetric Synthesis

418

 

7.5.1 Synthesis of Baccatin III, the Polycyclic Part of Taxol

419

 

7.5.2 Asymmetric Synthesis of the Taxol Side Chain

442

7.6

Summary

445

7.7

References

446

8 Enzymatic Reactions and Miscellaneous Asymmetric Syntheses

451

8.1

Enzymatic and Related Processes

451

 

8.1.1

Lipase/Esterase-Catalyzed Reactions

452

 

8.1.2

Reductions

454

 

8.1.3

Enantioselective Microbial Oxidation

455

 

8.1.4 Formation of C±C Bond

456

 

8.1.5 Biocatalysts from Cultured Plant Cells

458

8.2

Miscellaneous Methods

458

8.2.1Asymmetric Synthesis Catalyzed by Chiral

 

Ferrocenylphosphine Complex

458

8.2.2

Asymmetric Hydrosilylation of Ole®ns

459

8.2.3

Synthesis of Chiral Biaryls

460

xii CONTENTS

8.2.4 The Asymmetric Kharasch Reaction

464

8.2.5Optically Active Lactones from Metal-Catalyzed Baeyer-Villiger±Type Oxidations Using Molecular

Oxygen as the Oxidant

465

8.2.6Recent Progress in Asymmetric Wittig-Type

 

Reactions

466

8.2.7

Asymmetric Reformatsky Reactions

469

8.2.8

Catalytic Asymmetric Wacker Cyclization

470

8.2.9Palladium-Catalyzed Asymmetric Alkenylation of

 

Cyclic Ole®ns

471

8.2.10

Intramolecular Enyne Cyclization

474

8.2.11

Asymmetric Darzens Reaction

475

8.2.12

Asymmetric Conjugate Addition

476

8.2.13

Asymmetric Synthesis of Fluorinated Compounds

481

8.3 New Concepts in Asymmetric Reaction

484

8.3.1

Ti Catalysts from Self-Assembly Components

484

8.3.2

Desymmetrization

486

8.3.3

Cooperative Asymmetric Catalysis

486

8.3.4Stereochemical Nonlinear E¨ects in Asymmetric

 

Reaction

492

8.3.5

Chiral Poisoning

494

8.3.6

Enantioselective Activation and Induced Chirality

496

8.4Chiral Ampli®cation, Chiral Autocatalysis, and the Origin of

 

Natural Chirality

499

8.5

Summary

501

8.6

References

501

Index

 

509